Monday, September 27, 2010

Banned Books Week: The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie

This year's Banned Books Week runs from September 25-October 2. During this time, I encourage you to read a banned book and blog about it. I'm going to run reviews of banned and/or challenged books that I've read and share some resources on education and advocacy as well. 


You can find the American Library Association's official Banned Books Week page here as well as links to downloads, lists and other resources.

I'm going to kick off the week with my review of Sherman Alexie's young adult classic, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, a book I loved and has been challenged recently in Missouri for language and sexual content. You can see a more detailed news story about it by clicking on the link.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie. Published 2007 by Little, Brown and Company. Paperback.

 
I'm a Powell's partner and receive a small commission on sales.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie, was one of my favorite reads of 2009.

Alexie's book is the story of a young boy known as Junior who's growing up on the Spokane Indian reservation. He's got some medical problems and he gets bullied a lot; his parents are unhappy; his older sister runs away. But he's got some things going for him, too- he's determined to get a good education and manages to get himself transferred to an all-white school off the reservation, where he excels at basketball and learns to believe in himself.

I loved this book. I loved it. I laughed and cried with his struggles, his victories and his defeats. Junior's dysfunctional family is every dysfunctional family, and his problems are the problems of every kid who ever felt like he didn't fit in or that nobody understood him (or her). He pushes his way through the pain of racism, defeatism and adolescence with a tenacity that was so affecting for being so real. Alexie tackles some tough issues- racism, poverty, addiction, discouragement and the deep pessimism that comes when you feel like the whole world is against you. Things don't always go well for Junior and he doesn't always win but he does his best and he does well.

The Absolutely True Diary is a book I wish I could give to every kid I know and everyone who ever was a kid. It's brilliant and beautiful and wonderful. I loved Alexie's writing, which, although clearly enough for a teen audience, doesn't condescend or talk down and shows craft and skill enough for any adult to appreciate. Ellen Forney's comic-like illustrations, which pepper the story, are cute and sweet and darkly funny. I burned through it in about three days over the summer when I was home sick and can't think of a better way to spend time than reading this lovely gem of a book.


FTC Disclosure: I did not receive this book for review from the publisher.

13 comments:

rhapsodyinbooks said...

I thought this book was fabulous. I can't imagine why anyone would even dream up wanting to ban it!

Nana Fredua-Agyeman said...

and why is it a banned/challenged book, BB?

Thanks for your review. I can see you really loved it.

Mystica said...

Any specific reason to ban this book? Sounds a wonderful book.

Trisha said...

I keep seeing this one around - or at least I used to see it all the time - but I still haven't read it. Time to fix that!

Zibilee said...

I have read tons of great reviews on this book and really want to take the chance to read it. I think it's terrible that people want to ban it. Great review, Marie. I will be looking forward to it!

Kathleen said...

Great review. I've had this one on my list for quite some time. I've heard 100% positive about it and wonder why it was banned?

contemplatrix said...

I am with you. This is one book I feel I could give to any teenager I know and even those I don't, and recommend without thought of gender or race or economic circumstance.

I love in the Stockton, MO Debate the young woman Dakota Freeze saying, “It’s not about giving up. It’s about not letting people tell you you’re not worth it.” Felt very proud of this young woman for standing up for this book.

~L

Marie said...

All, I changed the link on the challenge to link to a story about why the book was banned. It seems it was mostly to do with language and sexual content- the usual suspects in cases like this.

jewwishes said...

Ah, the usual suspects, good grief, give us a break.

bermudaonion said...

I bought this not long ago because of great reviews I've read - I had no idea it's been banned. I am rolling my eyes.

Vasilly said...

Yay, Marie! This is one of my favorite books from this year. I'm so glad that you enjoyed it!

Buried In Print said...

"I loved this book. I loved it." That's it: exactly! I had a very similar reaction a few weeks ago, immediately followed by wanting every reader I know to pick up Junior's story too. I'm reading Reservation Blues now and it's wonderful too, with poetry where the pictures were in TATAOAPTI.

stacybuckeye said...

This was one of my favorite books last year too! Hubby and I listened to the audio read by the author on a car trip and it was beyond excellent. My husband still talks about it and that is rare.