Sunday, March 15, 2009

Sunday Salon

I don't know how much reading I'll be doing today. After work we're going to a friend's house for a Saint Patty's Day party. We'll probably miss the parade but the party should be a good time.

I will be doing an Irish giveaway on Saint Patrick's Day only so come back then & enter!

Do you have any favorite Irish writers? My favorite Irish novelist is the incredible Iris Murdoch, author of many wonderful novels including The Black Prince, The Sea, The Sea and others. Other names you might recognize include Eoin Colfer, C.S. Lewis, Maeve Binchy, Sebastian Barry, Anne Enright and John Banville.

Looking over my TBR shelves I can only find one Irish book- J.G. Farrell's Troubles, which I picked up used a few weeks ago. It's not contemporary- it was written in the 1970s and set in the 1920s (I think- I'm too lazy to check at the moment)- but it looks good. I just finished a book yesterday so I could start this one next... Well, we'll see.

Have you finished or started anything this weekend?

10 comments:

Nymeth said...

I haven't read any Irish Murdoch yet, but I really ought to change that. Irish writers I like include Oscar Wilde, Padraic Colum and Roddy Doyle. Happy Sunday!

Anne said...

My favorite is James Joyce. There is endless opportunity to learn something new in every book. Or at least,in the guide to the books! I have the reader's guides to both Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake (and it's a struggle to get through the guides, much less the books!) But especially with Ulysses, they are gifts that keep on giving. As is, I should add, a collection of poems by William Butler Yeats.

Blodeuedd said...

I love Sebastian Barry ever since I read The Long Long Way, and I also a fan of Marian Keyes, cos I do like chick-lit

debnance said...

Everyone is Beautiful...the author is a fellow Texan. It's the second book I've read by this author, Katherine Center. She gets the real pain of having kids. Hysterical.

Gavin said...

I love William Trevor, Edna O'Brien, Eavan Boland, Seamus Heaney, John McGahern, Brian O'Nolan, Frank O'Conner and of course, Jonathan Swift and Samuel Beckett.

J.C. Montgomery said...

I bought more of Maeve Binchey's work after reading the anthology IRISH GIRLS ABOUT TOWN.

I read it during the read-a-thon and couldn't put it down, all the stories, and writers were so good.

This weekend though, I have an ARC I need to get finished. Interestingly it's a memoir, which I normally don't read, but this one sounded too good to not ask for.

It's called A LUCKY CHILD by Thomas Buergenthal.

Lo said...

I've been a Maeve Binchy fan for decades. I like C.S. Lewis's works, John Banville, and also Colm Toibin.

Thanks for visiting, earlier.
I am aware of the varied Christian denominations and the fact that Christians aren't "one homogenous mass" who agree on everything. It's the same way with the Jewish faith, and the various denominations/movements, within it. I wasn't speaking for myself when comparing Jews to Christians...I was referring to the book and Plotz, and his train of thought. There was no offense meant by me, whatsoever. I hope you realize that.
~~Lorri

Lo said...

I've been a Maeve Binchy fan for decades. I like C.S. Lewis's works, John Banville, and also Colm Toibin.

Thanks for visiting, earlier.
I am aware of the varied Christian denominations and the fact that Christians aren't "one homogenous mass" who agree on everything. It's the same way with the Jewish faith, and the various denominations/movements, within it. I wasn't speaking for myself when comparing Jews to Christians...I was referring to the book and Plotz, and his train of thought. There was no offense meant by me, whatsoever. I hope you realize that.
~~Lorri

Lo said...

Have a great Monday, Marie!
~~Lorri

Serena said...

I cannot wait for St. Patty's Day!